By A.C. James

Welcome to my blog interview with novelist Anthony Karakai. If you like what you read, please investigate his books at Amazon.

A.C. James: Hello, Anthony. Please tell us something about yourself, where you’re based, and how you came to be a writer.

Anthony: Hi A.C., thanks for having me. I’m an author who has released three books to date: Vagabond, The Black Lion: Satan’s Kingdom, and The End of Athens. I currently live in Australia. I began writing in my final year of college, before I ventured off to Europe for four months to go and see the world. When I returned, I wanted to share the feelings I experienced connecting with so many different cultures. Australia is so far away, you see, so the opportunity and experience of seeing life outside this big island was magical. I wrote Vagabond in response to that, and from there, I continued writing.

A.C. James: I’d love to visit Australia but have yet to make to the land down under 😉 Maybe one day… What genre do you generally write and what have you had published to-date? What do you think of eBooks?

Anthony: My first two novels are inspirational, coming of age stories. The Black Lion is a thriller. I’m going to follow up The Black Lion with a trilogy, and will likely continue the series for awhile to come. I love eBooks—all my novels are eBooks. At first I was slightly resistant to change, but now that I’ve become used to finding virtually anything and everything I want—literally at my fingertips—I’m hooked.

A.C. James: I know what you mean. I’m quite addicted to my Kindle. Have you self-published? If so, what lead to you to become an indie author?

Anthony: I have. Indie authors really get total control over what they’re putting out there. This may sound trivial, but to me, the most important aspect of control is the book cover. Editors are of course essential, but I like having the final say on how my book will present itself.

A.C. James: I can definitely understand the appeal. Control over design and marketing are really important factors. And I was amazed when I found out how little editorial review goes into some traditionally published books. Do you have a favorite of your stories or characters?

Anthony: I don’t—I like them all for different reasons.

A.C. James: Which authors did you read when you were younger and did they shape you as a writer?

Anthony: Paulo Coelho and Haruki Murakami. They did shape me as a writer for different reasons. Coelho makes you feel emotion. Murakami’s words are like poetry. They are both masters, in my opinion.

A.C. James: You just put a huge smile on my face and I’m thinking instantly of1Q84. Do you manage to write every day, and do you plot your stories or just get an idea and run with it?

Anthony: I manage to write every day in some form, whether it’s my books or interviews. I generally get an idea and run with it, but I do loosely plot out how the story goes. I map out an idea for how each set of 50 pages will develop into the next set—then I freestyle write and let the story take on a life of its own.

A.C. James: That’s quite similar to how I operate. Do you do a lot of editing or research?

Anthony: Yes, I do a lot of both. Research especially—I have to ensure everything is factually correct, even if it’s fiction.

A.C. James: Readers pick up on historically or factually incorrect information and it can make someone put a book down. What point of view do you find most to your liking: first person or third person? Have you ever tried second person?

Anthony: I like them all, but I believe first person allows the reader to be drawn into the story more easily. Third person can be excellent when executed correctly.

A.C. James: And what’s your favorite or least favorite aspect of your writing life? Has anything surprised you?

Anthony: There’s nothing I don’t like about the process of writing, but I will say that editing can be tedious. The only thing that has surprised me is the marketing: Authors who missed the KDP Promo ship when it first sailed are now stranded. Technology evolves, new platforms emerge and I’ve found that unless you are one of the first ones on board, it can become incredibly difficult to yield significant results. The good news is that digital publishing is still quite new, and there will hopefully be new opportunities in the future to help authors reach their desired market.

A.C. James: Audio can be worthwhile format. I think it’s important to explore all the avenues to reach readers. Are you involved in anything else writing-related other than actual writing or marketing of your writing?

Anthony: I work in journalism when time permits it.

A.C. James: Are you on any forums or networking sites? If so, how valuable do you find them?

Anthony: I’m on the major social media platforms, but I would say that Twitter is the better of the two. It allows you to reach out to people, which is great. Facebook works for some people, but I think it’s more difficult unless you’ve already hit it big.

A.C. James: I love Twitter—too much, in fact. What are you working on at the moment or next?

Anthony: I’ve just finished writing my first non-fiction book, titled ‘The Obsession.’ It’s about the world of soccer: fans, firms, players and just about everything else that the general sports enthusiast would need to know in order to get up to speed with the global game.

A.C. James: Tell us more about The End of Athens and why it’s been such a big hit with your readers.

Anthony: The End of Athens has resonated with people who enjoy inspirational, coming of age stories. While it’s a dystopian setting, the story really attempts to get readers thinking about the power of dreams, and the importance of protecting them. It isn’t a mindless read, so I would recommend it to those readers who like to become absorbed in a work and put their thinking caps on!

A.C. James: I can tell you this much. I just love the premise of The End of Athens. Where can we find out about you and your writing?

http://www.anthonykarakai.com. I post updates about my books and other literary-related topics. I’m on Facebook as well (http://www.facebook.com/karakaibooks) and Twitter @AnthonyKarakai.

A.C. James: Thank you for interviewing today on my Paranormal Passion blog! Good luck with The Obsession.

The End of Athens
Anthony Karakai

Genre: Dystopian Thriller/Urban Fantasy

ASIN: B00CLXM6WY

Number of pages: 320
Word Count: 70,000

Cover Artist: Anthony Karakai

Amazon

Book Description:

In the year 2091, humans have lost the ability to dream. After decades of financial and social depression, dreams and aspirations have become a recessive gene—an impossibility of the modern mind. 
Greece is one of the worst social and economic disaster zones, and all hope of a better future has been lost. One young man, Nikos, discovers that he is not like everybody else—there is something different about him.
Believing that he may be going crazy, he soon discovers that he is the only person in Greece who has inherited the ability to dream. Time is running out as the government continues its tirade of corruption and suppression against the people, and Nikos must find a way to teach others how to dream so that once more society can free itself from the shackles of mental slavery.
About the Author: 

Anthony Michael Karakai was born in Melbourne, Australia, and is a dual citizen of Hungary. Holding an International Business degree, he is also a qualified percussionist and music producer, having studied music extensively since the age of seven. Working in journalism, his work has been published in various magazines and websites. With an insatiable appetite for travel and an eagerness to explore off the beaten path, Karakai travels at every opportunity- his travels and ongoing commitment to exploring the world are what inspires him to write.


Twitter: @AnthonyKarakai


Good Reads: Anthony Karakai

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